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Barry Harris - Magnificent!

track 1. Bean & The Boys:
(Coleman Hawkins)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 2. You Sweet And Fancy Lady:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 3. Rouge:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 4. Ah-leu-cha:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 5. Just Open Your Heart:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 6. Sun Dance:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 7. These Foolish Things
(Remind Me Of You)
:

(Marvell - Link - Strachey)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 8. Dexterity:
(Charlie Parker)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York


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Barry Harris - Magnificent!

track 1. Bean & The Boys:
(Coleman Hawkins)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 2. You Sweet And Fancy Lady:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 3. Rouge:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 4. Ah-leu-cha:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 5. Just Open Your Heart:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 6. Sun Dance:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 7. These Foolish Things
(Remind Me Of You)
:

(Marvell - Link - Strachey)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 8. Dexterity:
(Charlie Parker)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York


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Barry Harris - Magnificent!

track 1. Bean & The Boys:
(Coleman Hawkins)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 2. You Sweet And Fancy Lady:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 3. Rouge:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 4. Ah-leu-cha:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 5. Just Open Your Heart:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 6. Sun Dance:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 7. These Foolish Things
(Remind Me Of You)
:

(Marvell - Link - Strachey)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 8. Dexterity:
(Charlie Parker)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York


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Barry Harris - Magnificent!

track 1. Bean & The Boys:
(Coleman Hawkins)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 2. You Sweet And Fancy Lady:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 3. Rouge:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 4. Ah-leu-cha:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 5. Just Open Your Heart:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 6. Sun Dance:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 7. These Foolish Things
(Remind Me Of You)
:

(Marvell - Link - Strachey)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 8. Dexterity:
(Charlie Parker)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York


Wanna Buy It? - OR - Back To Site Index

Barry Harris - Magnificent!

track 1. Bean & The Boys:
(Coleman Hawkins)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 2. You Sweet And Fancy Lady:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 3. Rouge:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 4. Ah-leu-cha:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 5. Just Open Your Heart:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 6. Sun Dance:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 7. These Foolish Things
(Remind Me Of You)
:

(Marvell - Link - Strachey)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 8. Dexterity:
(Charlie Parker)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York


Wanna Buy It? - OR - Back To Site Index

Barry Harris - Magnificent!

track 1. Bean & The Boys:
(Coleman Hawkins)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 2. You Sweet And Fancy Lady:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 3. Rouge:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 4. Ah-leu-cha:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 5. Just Open Your Heart:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 6. Sun Dance:
(Barry Harris)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 7. These Foolish Things
(Remind Me Of You)
:

(Marvell - Link - Strachey)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York

track 8. Dexterity:
(Charlie Parker)
25 November 1969

at the RCA Studios in New York


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Magnificent!
Barry Harris

Prestige Records - OJC Original Jazz Classics
[OJC-102602]


piano - Barry Harris
bass - Ron Carter
drums - Leroy Williams

1970 LP Liner Notes:
________A new recording by Barry Harris (bio) is always a welcome event. This one, his third for Prestige, is especially so because it presents him in a trio context, backed only by bass and drums. In his first outing for the label, "Luminescence!" (Prestige 7498), the sextet format with its three-horn front line is observed throughout, although there are two numbers where Harris is the only soloist. "Bull's Eye!" (Prestige 7600), another sextet date, has two tracks set aside for Barry at the head of a trio. Not that those aren't brilliant albums with excellent solos by the horns as well as top-flight Harris, but here it is all Barry and the opportunity to absorb a full course piano banquet of such maturity and accomplishment is indeed a rare treat.

_____Not long after this album was made Harris was playing as a soloist opposite Thelonious Monk's quartet at the Village Vanguard. I was in the midst of writing a retrospective piece about Charlie Parker, and after listening to Barry Harris, a man who is keeping Parker's music alive, I asked him how he felt about Bird 15 years after his death. "Therapeutic", said Harris, without hesitation, in recognition of that marvelous ability Parker has to make one feel good through the beauty and sheer rhythmic power of his playing.

_____The kind of thrust inherent in the rhythmic conception that Parker helped introduce to jazz in the 1940s provides an incredibly uplifting kind of swing when it is applied right. Barry Harris has absorbed Bird's message so thoroughly that he is a musical therapist with the right prescription for neutralizing and eliminating doldrums, depression, and ennui.

_____Don't take my word for it. Just begin by playing side A, track 1 of this record. After six minutes and 37 seconds of "Bean and the Boys" your soul will be nourished by a heavy inundation of musical vitamins. The line, concocted by Coleman Hawkins (hence the Bean) and recorded by the tenor saxophone giant in 1946 for the Sonora label, is based on the "Lover, Come Back to Me" chord sequence. Barry Harris, who was Hawk's pianist on many occasions in the late 1960s, dedicated this version to him. "...Bean could play the bell out of it..." he says. "...He had a fountain of youth thing going..." Producer Don Schlitten had been trying to get Barry Harris to record the number for some time. Barry Harris responded here by knocking it off in one fantastic take, aided in no small way by his rhythm cohorts, Ron Carter (bio) and Leroy Williams.

_____Ron Carter, of course, has established himself, since coming to New York in the early Sixties, as one of the most respected and requested bassists in jazz. He was an important cog in the Miles Davis rhythm section of the mid-Sixties along with Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams, and has enhanced his reputation with a variety of groups after leaving Miles Davis. Like Barry Harris, he is from Detroit.

_____Tony Williams, from Chicago, came to New York in 1967. He has worked with Booker Ervin, Sonny Rollins, and Clifford Jordan, and recorded with organist John Patton. Born in the Windy City on February 3, 1937, he began his career at 15 when he rescued a set of drums from the basement of the church where his grandfather was pastor. Leroy Williams is basically self-taught but did study for two months with Oliver Coleman when he was 20.

_____Around his hometown he played with bassist Scotty Holt, tenorman John Gilmore, and drummer Jack Dejohnette who was playing piano at the time. Later, he received a chance to back people like Gene Ammons, Sonny Stitt, and Bennie Green. From 1959 to 1964 he worked with pianist Judy Roberts. Leroy Williams, whose favorites are "...Max, Klook, Elvin, Philly, and all of 'em...", plays a little piano and would like to explore it further. But right now he is a very inspirational drummer with taste and a dancing, darting beat. "...He can really syncopate...", says Barry Harris approvingly. "...He really feels that offbeat thing..."

_____Ron Carter has the intro on Barry Harris' sly, insinuating, minor key "You Sweet and Fancy Lady" and later takes a finely intoned solo. Leroy Williams shows that he is as strong and subtle with brushes as with sticks. Barry Harris is most relaxed, flowing freely on top of the complementary rhythmic underpinning. He explains that this one is named for Billy Higgins' old lady. Barry Harris was playing at the 'Port of Call East' when Billy Higgins brought her in one night. She obviously made a strong impression.

_____ "Rouge" is not related to the song of the same name written by John Lewis and recorded by Miles Davis's famous nonet. This "Rouge" is another shade and creates such a romantic mood you can virtually smell a beautiful woman wafting by. A heavy boudoir groove worthy of Duke Ellington and/or Billy Strayhorn. Barry Harris can't remember how he began to write the piece. "...It just said, 'Bam...'"

_____Barry Harris once recorded Charlie Parker's contrapuntal composition "Chasin' the Bird". Now he has committed to tape Bird's other dual fine, the enigmatically titled "Ah-Leu-Cha". With his left hand he plays Parker's part and with his right, Miles Davis's from the original Savoy recording. Ron Carter, the horn-like bassist, plays the Bird segment in unison with Barry Harris. "Ah-Leu-Cha" may start with the premise of "I Got Rhythm" but then proceeds to answer the question, "Who could ask for anything more?" Barry Harris carries high the banner of Charlie Parker and Bud Powell.

_____The Monkish side of his musical personality emerges on the lovely, lilting "Just Open Your Heart" which he wrote while at the 'Port of Call East'. "...There's an old beat-up grand piano...", explains Barry. "...Some people say it sounds like a harpsichord. I dug it so much, I couldn't get up from between sets...". Ron Carter has a long, mellow solo here and Leroy Williams again utilizes his brushes.

_____Leroy Williams, who was responsible for the title, also named the slowly undulating "Sun Dance" (again no connection with the John Lewis melody done by the Modern Jazz Society in 1955, but how is that for coincidence?), a Latinate blues reminiscent of Oscar Pettiford's "Blues in the Closet" (or "Collard Greens and Black-Eyed Peas," if you will). The rhythm never gets into 4/4 when the improvisation starts so that there is an unbroken mood within which Barry Harris reaches some extremely exquisite moments.

_____There's not much you can say about an evergreen like "These Foolish Things" except that it has that self renewing characteristic of the quality ballads of the Thirties and Forties and that Barry Harris helps it to receive the kind of treatment it deserves. He calls to mind the Bud Powell of the vintage Blue Notes like "You Go to My Head" and "It Could Happen to You".

_____The closer is "Dexterity", a Charlie Parker line that Barry Harris has played for a long time. He states the theme swiftly and dextrously with both hands except on the bridge, where he breaks out into single-line. Leroy Williams dials a 'Roachian' solo and Ron Carter walks strong, sure, and fast. It is an up ending to a trio recital of great artistic achievement.

_____Magnificent!

(...These notes from Ira Gitler appeared on the original LP liner - February 1970.)

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Barry Harris: a bio
____________Barry Harris was born in Detroit on December 15, 1929. One of the major bop pianists of the last half of the 20th century, Barry Harris has long had the ability to sound very close to Bud Powell, yet he can also do convincing impressions of Thelonious Monk and has his own style within the bop idiom.

_____He was an important part of the Barry HarrisDetroit jazz scene of the 1950s, and has been a jazz educator since that era. Barry Harris recorded his first set as a leader while in 1958, and moved to New York in 1960, where he spent a short period with Cannonball Adderley's Quintet. He also recorded with Dexter Gordon, Illinois Jacquet, Yusef Lateef, and Hank Mobley, and was with Coleman Hawkins off and on throughout the decade (including Hawk's declining years).

_____In the 1970s, Barry Harris was on two of Sonny Stitt's finest records ("Tune Up" and "Constellation"), and made many recordings in a variety of settings for Xanadu. Barry Harris has mostly worked with his trio since the mid-'70s, and he has recorded as a leader for Argo (1958), Riverside, Prestige, MPS, Xanadu, and Red.

(...from Scott Yanow ...)

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Ron Carter: a bio
____________Ron Carter was born on May 4, 1937 in Ferndale, Michigan. The epitome of class and elegance, though not stuffy.

_____Ron Carter has been a world class bassist and cellist since the '60s. He's among the greatest accompanists of all time, but has also done many albums exhibiting his prodigious technique. He's a brilliant rhythmic and melodic player, who uses everything in the bass and cello arsenal; walking lines, thick, full, prominent notes and tones, drones and strumming effects, and melody snippets. His bowed solos are almost as impressive as those done with his fingers.

_____Ron Carter has been featured in clothing, instrument, and pipe advertisements; he's close to being the bass equivalent of a Duke Ellington in his mix of musical and extra-musical interests. Ron Carter's nearly as accomplished in classical music as jazz, and has performed with symphony orchestras all over the world. He's almost exclusively an acoustic player; he did play electric for a short time in the late '60s and early '70s, but hasn't used it in many, many years.

_____Ron Carter began playing cello at ten. But when his family moved from Ferndale to Detroit, Ron Carter ran into problems with racial stereotypes regarding the cello and switched to bass. He played in the Eastman School's Philharmonic Orchestra, and gained his degree in 1959. He moved to New York and played in Chico Hamilton's quintet with Eric Dolphy, while also enrolling at the Manhattan School of Music. Ron Carter earned his master's degree in 1961. After Hamiliton returned to the West Coast in 1960, Ron Carter stayed in New York and played with Dolphy and Don Ellis, cutting his first records with them. He worked with Randy Weston Ron Carterand Thelonious Monk, while playing and recording with Jaki Byard in the early '60s.

_____Ron Carter also toured and recorded with Bobby Timmons' trio, and played with Cannonball Adderley. He joined Art Farmer's group for a short time in 1963, before he was tapped to become a member of Miles Davis' band. Ron Carter remained with Miles Davis until 1968, appearing on every crucial mid-'60s recording and teaming with Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams to craft a new, freer rhythm section sound. The high profile job led to the reputation that's seen Ron Carter become possibly the most recorded bassist in jazz history. He's been heard on an unprecedented number of recordings; some sources claim 500, others have estimated it to be as many as 1,000.

_____The list of people he's played with is simply too great to be accurately and completely cited. Ron Carter's been a member of New York Jazz Sextet and New York Jazz Quartet, V.S.O.P. Tour, Milestone Jazzstars,and was in one of the groups featured in the film "Round Midnight" in 1986. He's led his own bands at various intervals since 1972, using a second bassist to keep time and establish harmony so he's free to provide solos. Ron Carter even invented his own instrument, a piccolo bass. Ron Carter's also contributed many arrangements and compositions to both his groups and other bands. He's done duo recordings with either Cedar Walton or Jim Hall. Ron Carter has recorded for Embryo/Atlantic, CTI, Milestone, Timeless, EmArcy, Galaxy, Elektra, and Concord, eventually landing at Blue Note for LPs including 1997's "The Bass and I", 1998's "So What?", and 1999's "Orfeu". "When Skies Are Grey" surfaced in early 2001.

(...from Ron Wynn ...)

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